Radio Etiquette

This post is for all our convention-organizer friends who have to use any kind of two-way radio during their con. And you’re right, most of this seems obvious. But we’ve seen things, man! There are a lot of people who work a convention just to grab a radio and enjoy some kind of rush throughout the weekend. Many of them don’t know what they’re doing. Or they abuse the privilege. Usagi Medical Group works hand-in-glove with both convention staff and licensed first-responders who may be on scene. Proper radio etiquette helps us avoid delays and mistakes. We hope your personnel will find these guidelines useful in avoiding unnecessary frustrations in times of an emergency.

Get Prepared

Know how to use the radio. Know what the PTT (Push To Talk) button does. Know how to not trigger it by accident. Hold the button down firmly when talking, and be sure to LET IT GO when you are done. When you have the PTT button pressed, no one else can speak or be heard. You might be blocking someone on your frequency with an emergency message. You’ll drain your radio battery faster, too! Let. It. Go.

(BTW, remember to talk across the microphone, and not directly into it.)

Identify Yourself and Your Recipient

Know in advance what you are going to say. Take a moment to get collected and maybe even mentally rehearse your message. Decide who the intended recipient of the message is. Start your transmission with your name, followed by your department, and follow that with the name of the intended receiving department. “This is Holly with Main Events to UsagiMed.” There’s no point doing much more than identifying yourself and the recipient at this point. When the recipient acknowledges you, you can transmit the rest of your message.  

Short, Clear, Concise

As a general rule, if your message is longer than 20 seconds, use your phone instead. It’s best to keep your transmissions short, clear, and to the point. This gives other users an opportunity to acknowledge your message or request further clarification before you carry on with your next point.  

Be Patient

LISTEN for a response. The other person may not be able to respond immediately–be patient and give them time to reply before re-sending your call.

Acknowledging The Message

UMG first responders fill a necessary gap for conventions and event planners.

Radio users sometimes repeat a message to make it clear that they’ve heard and understood the information. For example:

Public Safety: “Jared with Public Safety to UsagiMed. Assistance required at Western Ballroom.”

UsagiMed: “This is UsagiMed confirming assistance required at Western Ballroom. We’re on our way.”

These Useful Guidelines

Please refer to these handy guidelines. (Only one page long, it’s suitable for downloading, printing, and distributing to your staff.) Remember, everyone is listening.

(It’s a handy one-pager.)

Heading to MTAC Lunar

We’re heading back to Nashville, Tennessee for the 2019 Middle Tennessee Anime Convention (MTAC)! We will be on-site providing our Walk-In Clinic and Emergency Medical Response services.  

As you’re getting ready for MTAC, remember to break in your shoes. Blisters suck. Remember the 5-2-1 Rule. (Especially the 1 part.) And remember to STAY HYDRATED. We want to see you, and we want to see you having as much fun as possible.

We’re looking forward to seeing some old friends and making new ones while we’re there. Stop by to say hi and get a cool sticker!

Oh yeah! I’m sure you don’t need the reminder to bring your meds. And if you’re sick, consider protecting others. See you soon!

Crew Bio: Theja Lanka

I started working with the group that would become UsagiMed at Anime Weekend Atlanta 2013. At the time, I had just started medical school and was looking for like-minded people in the area. I saw AWA had a medical department so I jumped on the chance to get some experience and get a behind-the-scenes look at conventions. The crew was gracious enough to accept me as one of them. They have certainly seen me grow over the years from someone who was too reserved to practicing triangle bandages to becoming more confident in my decision making.

I got into anime sometime around the middle of high school when a girl in my class was retelling Rurouni Kenshin. I was completely entranced by the story. Having only watched Indian movies up to that point, it was great to see something without a forced love story. And then I awakened my powers of time dilation and immediately consumed more anime than should have been possible.

My favorite part of UsagiMed has to be eating food together in the mornings, and after the Saturday night dance when everyone is too tired.

Crew Bio: Jazmine H.

My name is Jazmine, but you can call me Jazz like the music. I’m a licensed EMT. I serve with Usagi Medical Group. I’ve been in the medical field for six years and I’m a licensed Aerospace Medical Technician with the United States Air Force. I am also a trained Cardiac Monitor Technician with Gwinnett Medical Center, and I’m a Nursing student at Georgia State University. My favorites animes are currently My Hero Academia and Food Wars, but my all time favorites include [anything] Studio Ghibli and Yuyu Hakusho. I prefer to watch shonen and slice of life anime and I’m not much of a manga reader. I’ve had the pleasure of working with the other medical professionals in UsagiMed since 2014. My favorite part of working with UsagiMed: I get to work with super smart, super geeky people like myself, and help all the con-goers enjoy the con every year. My favorite part of Anime Weekend Atlanta is the smaller con feeling you get with a big con experience. I love cosplay watching and going to the cool events we have planned every year.

Become A Part of UsagiMed

Friends, we are always on the lookout for medically skilled folks to join us as volunteers. If you or someone you know wants to be a part of what we do, please fill out the form linked here. Thank you! We hope to be working with you, soon.

We love our patients! And your patients will love your con for bringing us to the table.

A Quick Reminder

UsagiMed’s own Cody Steavens writes:

Greetings! We’re only a few days into the new year, and after the unfortunate events at Anime LA, UsagiMed would like to remind everyone in the convention community to be proactively safe and confident while you’re at con.

You can always count on UsagiMed to provide a safe place for con-goers at every convention we staff. If you find yourself feeling uncomfortable around someone, not feeling safe, need a quite place for a minute, trust your instincts, and let us help you. UMG makes every effort to provide a safe convention place for everyone. We work closely with venue security and convention staff to keep folks safe, happy, and comfortable.

A quick reminder about this old blog we wrote some time ago. Keep your eyes peeled here for more useful information about keeping your experience safe and stellar.

See You In 2019!!

This blog entry was authored by UsagiMed’s Joshua Law:

Hello to all of you out there in Con-Land! (Does that sound like the world’s most awesome amusement park, or what?) We at Usagi Medical would like to take a moment and talk about getting ready for the New Year.  There are a lot of resolutions about to be made.  Some will be kept. Others… well, we won’t point names, or name fingers…

But if your resolution is to be a part of a con, we would like for you to be safe about doing so.  Here are a few tips for people who want to add more cons to their list, or even go to a con for the first time, in 2019:

Get your shoes early.

Having shoes that are well broken in is a thing your feet and legs will thank you for at con.  Blisters can ruin a con experience, and we have had to help a lot of people, fans and family of fans alike, who would have had a much less painful time if they had just bought their shoes a month or two earlier, and taken the time to break them in before walking 2-3 miles a day at a convention.

Make sure your medications are ready and coming with you.

In all the excitement before a con, it is easy to forget to refill a prescription, or pick up that OTC allergy medication that you take daily.  If you are at a con, especially if you had to cross state lines to get to it, then getting a refill, or finding that brand you like can be tough.  Remove this headache entirely, by making sure 2-3 weeks before the con that you have all pharmaceutical needs covered.

Communication & Safety.

Know who you are going with, and know who you’re staying with. Check in periodically with someone who is not attending the con.  All of this is for your safety.

Budgeting.

It is important to know how much you can spend getting to the con, at the con, and with friends away from the con.  It’s not fun, even for math nerds, but it is important.

And finally,

Food.

If you have special dietary requirements, make sure you plan accordingly as you are getting ready for the con.  Learn what restaurants in the area have food that you can eat, and which have food you cannot.  If you need to bring food with you, make sure you have a way of keeping it fresh and safe to eat until 2-3 days after the convention.

We hope to see you at many cons, please come by and give us a wave as you enjoy the fandom.

In the meantime, we hope you and yours are looking forward to a 2019. Happy Holidays! See you soon!

Some Kind Words…

I just wanted to take a moment to share a bit of wonderful feedback we got from a guest at Anime Weekend Atlanta:

“I was at AWA this weekend and wanted to thank everyone at UsagiMed who helped me out. I got sick from being in the heat in a hot costume and everyone who helped me was great! …I just really wanted to be able to contact someone to show my gratitude. If I were at any other con without UsagiMed I would have been so much worse off, and I probably would have gone past heat exhaustion to heat stroke. Next time, I’ll remember to drink more water! Even if it means having to wrestle with a body suit to use the restroom. Again, thank you so, so much.”

We were happy to help, of course, and we’re glad all our friends and guests made it safely back home. Usagi Medical Group wants to be available to more cons across the southeast so we can help others.  Please tell your friends about us!

UsagiMed at Anime Weekend Atlanta 2018

We’re Heading To Anime Weekend Atlanta 2018!

Usagi Medical Group has been busy planning for Anime Weekend Atlanta 2018 (AWA). With over 30,000 guests in attendance, we expect to help close to 400 people with all manner of first-aid needs, and will be doing emergency medical response throughout the convention.

UsagiMed remains an integral part of AWA crew training. In addition to general training, our personnel train AWA crew in CPR, disaster readiness, and even radio etiquette. UsagiMed works closely with convention public safety, and venue personnel. These things help define the convention’s professional culture and commitment to the guest experience.

How Do You Find UsagiMed?

Affectionately known as “The Hutch,” we are located in the Library over in the Waverly.  You can find us under the First Aid sign, across from the Registration windows.

When is Usagi Medical Group Open?

UMG has a clinic for all AWA attendees and crew during the following hours during AWA’s 2018 convention:

September 20: Noon to 8pm
September 21: 10am to 8pm
September 22: 10am to 8pm
September 23: 10am to 3pm

convention medicine
Tools of the UMG trade

During this time, convention attendees can drop-in for basic first-aid, blood pressure, and over-the-counter medications. Everyone who wants to take something from the “pharmacy” must fill out a form, so that we can monitor workload, improve staffing and supplies, and limit our liability.

After these hours, people with minor medical needs may visit a local 24 hour pharmacy or call 911. The pharmacy closest to the convention center is Walgreens located at 2670 Cobb Parkway, SE, Smyrna, GA 30080.

After these posted hours, UMG “shuts the front door” and responds to emergencies only by sending a mobile team with a response bag for those who are too injured/ill to move.

Come See Us!

AWA is the place where UsagiMed was born. It’s like “going home” for the UsagiMed crew. If you’re at the con, please stop by, pick up a sticker, and say Hello!

Condoms

(The reader will understand if we don’t readily illustrate this one.)

Many people know Usagi Medical Group for the great work we do helping people with first aid needs or emergency medical response in more serious circumstances. We also do a lot to address larger public health issues like avoiding con-crud, personal safety, and sexual health. That’s why you can always come by the UsagiMed station and grab a condom (male or female).

You already know that condoms are a great way to help protect against pregnancy, HIV, and other sexually transmitted diseases. However, for a condom to be effective at all, one must know how to use them properly, and they must be used every time.

Proper storage of condoms is also important to keep them from breaking while in use. Condoms should not undergo long-term storage in a high-temperature area (such as six months in your wallet). Anyone who tells you that size is an issue is lying. You can fit a condom over your entire hand (go ahead, we’ll wait while you try this out for yourself). You can even stretch a standard condom along the entire length of a broom handle.

You have tons of choices in the world of prophylactics. Do you need spermicide? Texture? Extra lubrication? It is generally advised that you DO NOT add anything to a condom before putting it on. Some lubes dissolve condoms. Oh, it is also generally advised that you determine if you have an allergy to your condoms before you actually use them.

Need a condom while you’re at con? Come see us.